Multi.Colored

for tattooed people, and those who want to be

A failed unification

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I babysat for Our Official Grandson the other night. His parents have a fairly large hi-def TV, which is something we don’t have, and won’t be getting any time soon.

What’s that got to do with tattoos? Well, I watched “American Chopper” in HD for the first time and got a better look at Paul Teutul Sr.’s tattoos.

Yuck.  🙂

He’s had multiple artists work on his arms, and if I recall correctly, he had one of them try to unify all the separate artworks.  He’s got odd litle blobs between the designs, mostly.  I’m not sure what they were intended to be or to do, but the overall effect looks pretty bad.

I understand the desire to turn separate tattoos into one.  I’ve done it myself.  When it’s done right, it enhances the artwork.  (I like to think that my additions turned a mediocre tattoo into a good one.)  When it’s done by a lesser artist, as apparently Paul Sr’s was…   well, the result is unfortunate.

But what happens after something like that is done?  Does the tattooed person just consider all the work that went into it, and accept it despite the fact that it doesn’t look good?  I wouldn’t, myself.  Of course, I had the artist draw out the transformation before agreeing to the work.  So if it had turned out badly I would have been just as responsible.

Have you tried to unify separate works?  If so, how did it turn out?

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Author: infmom

I got my first tattoo when I was 46. I hope the people who read this blog don't have to wait that long. I love talking about body art.

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  1. Pingback: Sometimes getting a clear look is not so good. | Multi.Colored …

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